Saturday, February 17, 2018  EMF movement studies
Research visits to locations of energy transformation and distribution.
In collaboration with Justine Chambers.

lilith flyer #2 lilith flyer #2
lilithlith
play_arrow pause stop

Sunday, February 4, 2018 10am-5pmBuntzen Lake Reservoir site visit
A collective documentation walk along the shore.

Wednesday, February 7, 2018 9-10pm   CFRO broadcast 100.5 FM
A selection of field recordings, sound documents, and compositions.
Co-produced with Soundscape.

lilith

hum

/hʌm/

:glossary

v.,

To utter a low inarticulate vocal sound in expression of dissent or dissatisfaction.

n.,

unwanted low-frequency variations in current or voltage which will give rise in a loudspeaker to a steady humming sound.

infrastructure

/ˈɪnfrəˌstrʌktjʊə/

from the Latin

  infera [beneath] +

structura [construction]

n.,

Construction that lies beneath, underground; not to be seen.

n.,

A collective term for the subordinate parts of an undertaking.

lilithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlithlith

Sings the hiss high white noise, softer but more
Shrill than whistling, the musical penetration of

aural ASCII

lived electromagnetism

/lɪvd/ᵻˌlɛktrə(ʊ)ˈmaɡnᵻtɪz(ə)m/

A messy practice resulting from an asynchronous amalgam of perceptual experiences, developing vernaculars and discourses, technologies and scientific knowledge. Lived electromagnetism has its historical basis in such things as

r a i n b o w s, electric motors, and telecommunications...

listening

/ˈlɪs(ə)nɪŋ/

n.,

The action of the verb listen

adj.

That listens attentively

A question asked elsewhere but useful in this context: “To what extent is listening

thinkable?”

trespass

/ˈtrɛspəs/

v., To enter unlawfully on the land of another.

To make an improper or uninvited inroad on;

to intrude on or upon the rights or domain of;

to encroach on, infringe.

whistler

/ˈhwɪs(ə)lə/

n., A person, animal, or thing that whistles.

n., A large species of marmot found in mountainous parts of North America known for its high-pitched warning issued to alert other members of the colony to possible danger.

n., An atmospheric heard as a whistle that falls in pitch, caused by radio waves generated by lightning and guided by the lines of force of the earth's magnetic field. Frequencies of terrestrial whistlers are 1 kHz to 30 kHz, with a maximum amplitude at 3 kHz to 5 kHz.

n.,Sḵwiḵw, unceded Coast Salish territories of the S kw xwú7mesh and Líl̓wat First Nations.